8 Facts You Should Know About Grizzly Bears

Grizzlies Are Surprisingly Fast

Grizzlies are three to nine feet long and eight feet tall on two legs. Adult grizzlies weigh 700 800 pounds, with some males reaching 1,700 pounds.

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They Go by Many Names

While generally called brown bears, the North American, Kodiak, and peninsular grizzlies are technically recognized as Ursus arctos horribilis, middendorffi, and gyas

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North American Grizzlies Are at Risk

With 1,500 to 1,700 grizzlies in five continental U.S. populations, largely in Glacier and Yellowstone National Parks, decades of protection have helped restore the numbers

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They Have a Hump

Grizzlies have shoulder humps, unlike black bears.1Grizlies use their humps as strength to push their front legs for speed and excavate winter burrows on steep mountains.

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They Take Eating Seriously

Omnivorous grizzlies eat a lot. They consume roots, grasses, berries, nuts, fish, rodents, elk, and carrion. They consume what's abundant in their habitat and season.

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They Are Not True Hibernators

Although not real hibernators, grizzlies torpor in winter. They can wake up, but they usually stay in their warm caves without eating, drinking, or eliminating.

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Grizzly Cubs Stay With Their Mom

After 180 to 266 days of gestation, female grizzlies have their first pups between four and seven years old.4The small, blind, vulnerable cubs weigh roughly one pound at birth.

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They Have Several Modes of Communication

Grizzlies are recognized for their sense of smell, but they communicate with each other and their surroundings in other ways. Grizzlies communicate with mates and young by groaning, grunting

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